Features
Gibson RSS Feed
Gibson on YouTube
Gibson on Facebook
Gibson on Twitter
Follow Us
Follow Us

True Pitch and Solid Tone: Gibson’s Tune-O-Matic Bridge

Dave Hunter
|

10.10.2007

|
Comments
We might take it for granted today, but the facility to individually adjust an independent bridge saddle for each string was an impressive development when it first hit the guitar world more than 50 years ago. Prior to the arrival of the Tune-o-matic bridge in 1954, Gibson electrics carried either a floating bridge with compensated one-piece rosewood or ebony saddle, a rudimentary trapeze tailpiece with integral wrapover bridge bar, or a stud-mounted wraparound bridge, each of which offered only the crudest global intonation and height adjustment for the strings. When the Tune-o-matic bridge, also known as the ABR-1, first appeared—initially on the Les Paul Custom and then on the Goldtop Les Paul “Standard” the following year—it was a true revelation in intonation, and set a standard for simplicity and functionality that has never been bettered.
More...

Lucinda Williams Gets Her Groove Back: Live at Town Hall, New York, New York, 10/3/07

Josh Baron
|

10.09.2007

|
Comments
Lucinda Williams can make you feel uncomfortable. An artist of formidable talent, Williams is something of a perfectionist. It’s part of the reason why there was a six year gap between her second album, Sweet Old World and her Grammy-winning classic Car Wheels on a Gravel Road. It’s also the reason that this night—the second-to-last night of her performing each of her albums in their entirety in reverse chronological order followed by a second set of various material and guests—that the audience was uneasy. The previous Car Wheels night, which should have been a slam dunk, was, by all reports, uneven. Williams is highly susceptible to being affected by negative press and something she’d read earlier in the day had rankled her into a stale, grumpy mood. Even with the presence of Steve Earle and Jesse Malin among others, the night felt stuck in second. So as the lights went down at Town Hall, there was a collective deep breath. Within seconds it was clear Lucinda had gotten her groove back.
More...

Gibson Recommends Spoon (Free MP3 Download!)

Aidin Vaziri
|

10.09.2007

|
Comments
THE BAND: Spoon HOMETOWN: Austin, Texas PLAYERS: Britt Daniel (vocals, guitar), Jim Eno (drums), Rob Pope (bass), Eric Harvey (keyboards, percussion, guitar) WHAT TO BUY: Since Daniel and Eno formed the band in 1993, Spoon has released six full-length albums (and several EPs) with various lineups. The latest, Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga (July 2007, Merge Records), just happens to be one of the best. Standout tracks like "The Ghost of You Lingers" and "Finer Feelings" see the band adding punchy Motown horns, soulful grooves, and rolling pianos to its spiky, minimalist indie-rock sound.
More...

From High-Gain Lead to Vintage-Voiced Clean: Check Out the Epiphone Blues Custom 30 Amplifier

10.08.2007

|
Comments
There are so many new tube amplifier designs on the market today, alongside reissues of many of the classics, that wading into market to try to find the amp that’s right for you can feel like a plunge into murky, tangled waters. Throw into the pool the plethora of ever-improving solid-state and digital designs now available, and the range of choices gets more dizzying still. Talk to most tone-hungry guitarists, however—whether they’re pros or devoted weekend players—and most of them still prefer juicy, dynamic tube sounds, and enough versatility to cover a range of gigs without so many bells and whistles that it starts to detract from the core tone of the amplifier. What they want, in short, is the kind of amp that can be harder and harder to find amid the swamp of “special options” and pseudo-tech double talk out there today. Enter the Blues Custom 30, Epiphone’s workhorse for everyone from the aspiring hobbyist to the touring musician.
More...

Saves The Day's David Soloway Writes Explosive New Album on ES-330

Jonah Bayer
|

10.08.2007

|
Comments
Saves the Day may barely be a decade old, but they’re already veterans in the punk community who have influenced everyone from Fall Out Boy to Paramore. When asked about his band’s elder statesman status, guitarist David Soloway says, “Hearing that kind of stuff is incredibly flattering and gratifying because we don’t necessarily deserve this position more than any other band that’s been around for a while. Spending the couple of years on tour with younger bands and answering their questions has put a whole new level of significance to what it is we do." Soloway adds that during their current tour with Four Years Strong members of that band will fill in during Saves the Day's soundcheck because they already knew how to play their songs.
More...

The Starting Line’s Matt Watts: Call It a Comeback

Jonah Bayer
|

10.08.2007

|
Comments
Four years ago, the Starting Line were on top of the world. Their single, “Best of Me,” was all over music television stations, their smiling mugs were plastered all over magazines, and the band’s potential seemed endless. Unfortunately, when the band turned in the demos for their second full-length, Based On A True Story, Geffen told them to go back to the drawing board and thus began a year-long writing process that kept the group off the road and yielded song titles such as “Inspired by the Dollar $.”
More...

The Thrills Get Back to Basics on Teenager (Free MP3 Stream!)

Russell Hall
|

10.05.2007

|
Comments
It’s fitting that themes of lost innocence hover at the edges of Teenager, the third album from the Thrills. After garnering near-universal praise with their 2003 debut, So Much for the City, the Dublin-based quintet endured a temporary backlash when their 2004 follow-up, Let’s Bottle Bohemia, strived a bit too eagerly toward a more polished sound.
More...

He Wrote Hit Songs for Hendrix and Joplin But No One Knew Who He Was: How Chip Taylor Made a Name for Himself

Russell Hall
|

10.05.2007

|
Comments
Had Chip Taylor done nothing more than write the classics “Wild Thing” and “Angel of the Morning,” his place in rock history would be assured. Fact is, however, in addition to writing those songs, the New York City-based veteran has amassed a vast body of work rich in Americana traditions. As a recording artist in the ’70s and early ’80s, Taylor garnered a reputation for merging country and rhythm ’n’ blues in a way that gained notice in Nashville. Among his hits from this period were “Try (Just a Little Bit Harder),” which was co-written with Jerry Ragovoy and recorded by Janis Joplin, and “Son of a Rotten Gambler,” which became a Top Ten smash for Anne Murray in 1974 and was later covered by Emmylou Harris. After giving up music in the mid-’80s to become a professional gambler, Taylor undertook a national songwriter’s tour in 1993 and began writing again. Then came several solo albums and a fruitful collaboration with violinist/singer Carrie Rodriguez that yielded three acclaimed duet albums. Both he and Rodriguez returned to solo activities last year, but they remain close, and their chemistry lives on in the just-released Live from the Ruhr Triennale, which features Taylor on his Gibson J-45.
More...

Trini Lopez: Original Latin Pop Superstar and Inspiration for Gibson’s New Dave Grohl Inspired By DG-335

Gabriel J. Hernandez
|

10.05.2007

|
Comments
Growing up in the Latin “barrios” of Dallas, Texas, Gibson signature artist Trinidad “Trini” Lopez, III, learned quickly how to be a survivor. With four brothers, a sister, and a mother and father that did whatever it took to bring food to the table, Lopez’ early childhood struggles proved vital in preparing him for life as the original Latin pop superstar. As an adolescent in the early 1950s, Lopez was your typical teenager, hanging out with friends, occasionally getting into trouble and wanting to be everywhere but the classroom his parents insisted he stay in. What’s more, the elder Lopez—a musician himself— didn’t approve of his son’s circle of friends, and was always warning him to stay away from his associates. Legend has it that Lopez, Sr. grew so weary of his son’s behavior that one day he administered a severe beating in the hope of changing his son’s ways. Afterwards, he felt so bad he went out and purchased his son a black Gibson acoustic guitar. He taught him a few chords and the rest, you can say, is history!
More...

New Jersey Folk Rocker Matt White Has a J-200 and a Sweet, Guitar-Driven Album That’s Sure to Make Him a Star

David Sprague
|

10.04.2007

|
Comments
Some folks choose to pick up a guitar and play, while others have the call of the six-string encoded in their DNA—the latter category most assuredly includes Matt White, a New Jersey-bred folk-rocker with three generations of musical pedigree (not to mention a wicked way with a memorable hook) behind him.
More...
Displaying results 4841-4850 (of 5023)
 « First  < Previous   480 - 481 - 482 - 483 - 484 - 485 - 486 - 487 - 488 - 489  Next >   Last »