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Albert King: Born Under a Bad Sign Turns 40

Sean McDevitt
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10.12.2007

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Albert King occupies unique terrain in the land of the blues. His signature guitar sound, which combined metallic tone with a ferocious attack, relentless string-bending and an inclination toward economy, was wholly original. The fact that the left-handed King frequently used right-handed Flying Vs turned upside-down—with the low E string closest to the floor—also contributed to his sound, namely since he was pulling on the same strings that others were pushing. King’s guitar style wasn’t the only thing that made him special: He also created music that looked forward.
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Gibson Custom Shop Proudly Introduces the Dave Grohl Inspired By DG-335

Ellen Mallernee
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10.12.2007

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Gibson Custom Shop is proud to announce the release of the Dave Grohl Inspired By guitar—the DG-335. Beginning Thursday, October 4, the guitar—modeled after Grohl’s much-loved Gibson Trini Lopez signature model—will be available to Foo Fighters fans and guitarists everywhere. A fitting tribute to Grohl, this Gibson Inspired By model combines the bedrock authenticity of tradition with the power and passion of innovation. The DG-335 not only provides guitarists with the chance to channel the rock prowess of the Foo Fighters’ versatile frontman, but it also has the tone, performance, and style to be one of the most popular Inspired By models of all time.
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Pop-Punk Sensations All Time Low Turn It Way Up with Their Gibson SGs

Jonah Bayer
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10.12.2007

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Punk rock has always been about raw power and rebellion, and Maryland’s All Time Low is no exception. Barely out of high school, the band have just released the new disc So Wrong, It’s Right, one of the catchiest collections of pop punk since Blink-182’s Dude Ranch. “We definitely tried some new stuff on this record, but the root of our music is pop so we don’t want to get too technical and make the songs difficult to listen to,” explains frontman Alex Gaskarth. “For the most part we suck as guitar players so we kept it simple.”
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From the Attic to the Auction: The Skyrocketing Value of Vintage Gibsons

Russell Hall
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10.11.2007

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David Bonsey has the job that every guitar lover dreams of. As the reigning instrument expert at the Boston-based auction company Skinner Inc., he’s discovered and brokered some of the world’s most breathtaking and legendary vintage Gibson guitars. One of his favorite stories centers around a Sunburst ’59 Les Paul Standard that was auctioned last spring.
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Feast Your Eyes on Gibson's Guitars of the Week!

Ellen Mallernee
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10.11.2007

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This year Gibson introduced its groundbreaking Guitar of the Week program. Each week a new guitar, in a limited edition run of 400, is unveiled, and when they're sold, they are gone for good. From favorite, historically accurate Gibson designs no longer in production to exciting new models fresh off the drawing boards of the Gibson USA luthiers, each Guitar of the Week has been distinctive, eye-catching, and original. Now Gibson USA is proud to give you the final Guitar of the Week batch of the year. Feast your eyes.
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Bucking the Hum and Making History: Gibson’s Hallowed Patent Applied For Humbuckers

Dave Hunter
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10.11.2007

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It might not have been the first electric guitar pickup developed, but when Gibson’s Patent Applied For (PAF) humbucking pickup hit the scene it turned the industry’s thinking on its ear, and offered players unparalleled levels of sound and performance that set the standards for pickup design forever after. Check out the five-figure sums that collectors are willing to pay for an original pair of PAFs on the vintage market, or the way players flock in droves to accurate reproductions of these hallowed humbuckers, and you get an inkling of the impact they have had on the guitar world. Imagine how they must have appeared back in the mid 1950s when they appeared on their first Gibson guitars, in an era when your choice in pickups was single coil or… another single coil.
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True Pitch and Solid Tone: Gibson’s Tune-O-Matic Bridge

Dave Hunter
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10.10.2007

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We might take it for granted today, but the facility to individually adjust an independent bridge saddle for each string was an impressive development when it first hit the guitar world more than 50 years ago. Prior to the arrival of the Tune-o-matic bridge in 1954, Gibson electrics carried either a floating bridge with compensated one-piece rosewood or ebony saddle, a rudimentary trapeze tailpiece with integral wrapover bridge bar, or a stud-mounted wraparound bridge, each of which offered only the crudest global intonation and height adjustment for the strings. When the Tune-o-matic bridge, also known as the ABR-1, first appeared—initially on the Les Paul Custom and then on the Goldtop Les Paul “Standard” the following year—it was a true revelation in intonation, and set a standard for simplicity and functionality that has never been bettered.
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Lucinda Williams Gets Her Groove Back: Live at Town Hall, New York, New York, 10/3/07

Josh Baron
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10.09.2007

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Lucinda Williams can make you feel uncomfortable. An artist of formidable talent, Williams is something of a perfectionist. It’s part of the reason why there was a six year gap between her second album, Sweet Old World and her Grammy-winning classic Car Wheels on a Gravel Road. It’s also the reason that this night—the second-to-last night of her performing each of her albums in their entirety in reverse chronological order followed by a second set of various material and guests—that the audience was uneasy. The previous Car Wheels night, which should have been a slam dunk, was, by all reports, uneven. Williams is highly susceptible to being affected by negative press and something she’d read earlier in the day had rankled her into a stale, grumpy mood. Even with the presence of Steve Earle and Jesse Malin among others, the night felt stuck in second. So as the lights went down at Town Hall, there was a collective deep breath. Within seconds it was clear Lucinda had gotten her groove back.
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Gibson Recommends Spoon (Free MP3 Download!)

Aidin Vaziri
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10.09.2007

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THE BAND: Spoon HOMETOWN: Austin, Texas PLAYERS: Britt Daniel (vocals, guitar), Jim Eno (drums), Rob Pope (bass), Eric Harvey (keyboards, percussion, guitar) WHAT TO BUY: Since Daniel and Eno formed the band in 1993, Spoon has released six full-length albums (and several EPs) with various lineups. The latest, Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga (July 2007, Merge Records), just happens to be one of the best. Standout tracks like "The Ghost of You Lingers" and "Finer Feelings" see the band adding punchy Motown horns, soulful grooves, and rolling pianos to its spiky, minimalist indie-rock sound.
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From High-Gain Lead to Vintage-Voiced Clean: Check Out the Epiphone Blues Custom 30 Amplifier

10.08.2007

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There are so many new tube amplifier designs on the market today, alongside reissues of many of the classics, that wading into market to try to find the amp that’s right for you can feel like a plunge into murky, tangled waters. Throw into the pool the plethora of ever-improving solid-state and digital designs now available, and the range of choices gets more dizzying still. Talk to most tone-hungry guitarists, however—whether they’re pros or devoted weekend players—and most of them still prefer juicy, dynamic tube sounds, and enough versatility to cover a range of gigs without so many bells and whistles that it starts to detract from the core tone of the amplifier. What they want, in short, is the kind of amp that can be harder and harder to find amid the swamp of “special options” and pseudo-tech double talk out there today. Enter the Blues Custom 30, Epiphone’s workhorse for everyone from the aspiring hobbyist to the touring musician.
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