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Gibson: The True Sound of Punk

Ari Surdoval
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10.30.2007

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Ever since the raw, ragged sound of punk snarled out of the working-class basements and garages of the world—and for all intents and purposes, we could go all the way back to Elvis and Scotty Moore, or Link Wray and “Rumble,” or the none-hit wonders of the Nuggets era or the Stooges and MC5 in late-60s Detroit—Gibsons have defined the thick, buzz saw howl of punk guitar. Gibsons are truly able to deliver the throaty, growling ferocity of punk. Other guitars can render the music tinny and thinner than a skinny tie—more New Wave than “New Rose” for you kids playing at home. Dipping into our voluminous and cluttered editorial vaults, here are a few punk classics—story-wise, that is—from Gibson. Not only do we build the guitars that built punk, we’ve made sure to give credit where credit is due along the way.
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Gibson Recommends Gliss (Free MP3 Download!)

Russell Hall
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10.30.2007

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To download a free MP3 of Gliss’ “Kissing the Boulevard,” click here. BAND: Gliss HOMETOWN: Los Angeles, California PLAYERS: Martin Klingman (vocals, guitar), David Reiss (bass, guitar), Victoria Cecilia (drums, vocals) WHAT TO BUY: The band’s debut album, Love The Virgins, boasts a thrashy garage-rock sound with shades of Krautrock and the darker side of glam. Discerning ears will detect hints of the Stooges, Bauhaus, and the original Alice Cooper Group—had the latter removed the cartoon-like component from its ominous vibe. Gliss says it “makes ‘doing bad’ sound good enough not to dissuade anyone from hedonism.”
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Sideman Turned Lead Guitarist Nick Colionne Is Out Front and Loving It

Sean McDevitt
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10.30.2007

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There are few things in life that Nick Colionne enjoys more than the sounds of jazz emanating from his stereo, and he’s spent much of his life immersed in the genre. But the Chicago-based guitarist—a professional musician since the age of 15—says that it was being able to handle an array of other sounds and styles that once kept him on the road. “Jazz was my upbringing, but initially pursuing a career as a sideman meant I had to become well versed in R&B, blues, and heavy metal,” Colionne explains. “When I play live, I incorporate all kinds of music and have a lot of fun. All of these styles have contributed to defining my own sound as an artist.”
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Duane Allman, November 20, 1946 - October 29, 1971

10.30.2007

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It’s a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock and Roll): Real Life on the Road

William Deiter
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10.30.2007

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I am a U.S. Army soldier stationed in Germany—actually West Germany—and I’ve had the distinct opportunity to play several USAREUR (United States Army Europe) talent shows with my heavy metal cover band, Shattered Image, and my 1984 Gibson Les Paul Black Beauty.
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Louisiana Man Wins Gibson Sam Bush Signature Mandolin!

Ellen Mallernee
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10.29.2007

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Steve Meier of Lake Charles, Louisiana was the Grand Prize winner of the Gibson Original Acoustic Sam Bush Signature mandolin contest—a historic contest with a gorgeous prize at stake. More than 32,000 people visited the Gibson website to enter the random drawing to win the mandolin, designed and hand-signed by bluegrass legend Sam Bush. Upon hearing the news that he’d been selected as the winner of the mandolin, valued at $9,999.95, Meier couldn’t have been more thrilled. “My mandolin arrived this weekend,” Meier said Monday. “It is awesome. The craftsmanship is unreal. I hate putting it back in its case.”
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Young Hotshot Guitarist Jackie Greene Becomes Unlikely Member of Phil Lesh and Friends

Josh Baron
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10.29.2007

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Twenty-six-year old singer/songwriter Jackie Greene was never much of Deadhead, but that didn’t stop him from getting noticed by one of the band’s most prominent principals. In fact, after he got the Metallica and Guns N’ Roses bug out of his system in high school, he was much more of a soul and blues guy, soaking up Ray Charles, Muddy Waters, and Mississippi John Hurt. Greene was first noticed at an open mic night on his home turf in Northern California, and signed to DIG Music in 2001 where he released two albums, Gone Wonderin’ and Sweet Somewhere Bound. In 2004, he was sniffed out by a few majors and eventually signed to Verve.
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Gibson Recommends Wes Montgomery Live in ’65 DVD

Josh Baron
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10.29.2007

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As far as classic jazz albums go, Smokin’ at the Half Note is always a sleeper. Wes Montgomery’s style is effortless and fluid, rhythmically smooth and groovy—nothing ever comes off as angular or jutting. As you move through his other albums like Groove Yard, Boss Guitar, or Movin’ Wes, it’s clear they all have these qualities, especially when he locks in with pianists and B-3 players like Wynton Kelly or Jimmy Smith. These albums have always invoked the images of Montgomery playing, cigarette dangling from mouth, hands looming over his beloved Gibson L-5CES. But there’s never been any great film footage of the jazz legend doing what he did best. That is, until now.
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A Closer Look: Joy Division

Josh Baron
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10.29.2007

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Joy Division has always been one of those bands that occupy a unique space—short-lived, cagey, dark and tragic, they burned quick and bright. While hindsight has proved a double-edge sword as far critical evaluation, what’s unquestionable is that the band became a touchstone and reference point. Formed in 1976 in Manchester, England, the band went through several lineup alternations and name changes before becoming Joy Division in 1977. The lineup featured lead singer Ian Curtis, guitarist Bernard Sumner, bassist Peter Hook, and drummer Stephen Morris. Inspired by the D.I.Y.-ethos of the Sex Pistols, the primacy of Iggy Pop and, in certain ways, the Doors, along with the trippy, droning haze of the Velvet Underground, Joy Division cut a new swath with their music. Helping to spearhead the burgeoning sound of Manchester at the famed club The Factory, the band eventually signed to the venue’s label, Factory Records, despite Curtis’ entertainment of offers from major labels like RCA and Warner Bros.
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The Les Paul: More Than Just A Rocker

Dave Hunter
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10.26.2007

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Gibson’s Les Paul is legendary as a rock machine. It almost single-handedly forged the sound that defines classic British blues-rock, as well as being a centerpiece in a myriad of other heavy rock styles that require fat, rich, sustainful tones and fluid playability. But the Les Paul, in all its forms past and present, is capable of doing much more than just the rock thing, as great players have proved ever since the groundbreaking solidbody hit the scene 55 years ago.
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