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Saves The Day's David Soloway Writes Explosive New Album on ES-330

Jonah Bayer
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10.08.2007

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Saves the Day may barely be a decade old, but they’re already veterans in the punk community who have influenced everyone from Fall Out Boy to Paramore. When asked about his band’s elder statesman status, guitarist David Soloway says, “Hearing that kind of stuff is incredibly flattering and gratifying because we don’t necessarily deserve this position more than any other band that’s been around for a while. Spending the couple of years on tour with younger bands and answering their questions has put a whole new level of significance to what it is we do." Soloway adds that during their current tour with Four Years Strong members of that band will fill in during Saves the Day's soundcheck because they already knew how to play their songs.
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The Starting Line’s Matt Watts: Call It a Comeback

Jonah Bayer
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10.08.2007

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Four years ago, the Starting Line were on top of the world. Their single, “Best of Me,” was all over music television stations, their smiling mugs were plastered all over magazines, and the band’s potential seemed endless. Unfortunately, when the band turned in the demos for their second full-length, Based On A True Story, Geffen told them to go back to the drawing board and thus began a year-long writing process that kept the group off the road and yielded song titles such as “Inspired by the Dollar $.”
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The Thrills Get Back to Basics on Teenager (Free MP3 Stream!)

Russell Hall
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10.05.2007

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It’s fitting that themes of lost innocence hover at the edges of Teenager, the third album from the Thrills. After garnering near-universal praise with their 2003 debut, So Much for the City, the Dublin-based quintet endured a temporary backlash when their 2004 follow-up, Let’s Bottle Bohemia, strived a bit too eagerly toward a more polished sound.
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He Wrote Hit Songs for Hendrix and Joplin But No One Knew Who He Was: How Chip Taylor Made a Name for Himself

Russell Hall
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10.05.2007

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Had Chip Taylor done nothing more than write the classics “Wild Thing” and “Angel of the Morning,” his place in rock history would be assured. Fact is, however, in addition to writing those songs, the New York City-based veteran has amassed a vast body of work rich in Americana traditions. As a recording artist in the ’70s and early ’80s, Taylor garnered a reputation for merging country and rhythm ’n’ blues in a way that gained notice in Nashville. Among his hits from this period were “Try (Just a Little Bit Harder),” which was co-written with Jerry Ragovoy and recorded by Janis Joplin, and “Son of a Rotten Gambler,” which became a Top Ten smash for Anne Murray in 1974 and was later covered by Emmylou Harris. After giving up music in the mid-’80s to become a professional gambler, Taylor undertook a national songwriter’s tour in 1993 and began writing again. Then came several solo albums and a fruitful collaboration with violinist/singer Carrie Rodriguez that yielded three acclaimed duet albums. Both he and Rodriguez returned to solo activities last year, but they remain close, and their chemistry lives on in the just-released Live from the Ruhr Triennale, which features Taylor on his Gibson J-45.
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Trini Lopez: Original Latin Pop Superstar and Inspiration for Gibson’s New Dave Grohl Inspired By DG-335

Gabriel J. Hernandez
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10.05.2007

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Growing up in the Latin “barrios” of Dallas, Texas, Gibson signature artist Trinidad “Trini” Lopez, III, learned quickly how to be a survivor. With four brothers, a sister, and a mother and father that did whatever it took to bring food to the table, Lopez’ early childhood struggles proved vital in preparing him for life as the original Latin pop superstar. As an adolescent in the early 1950s, Lopez was your typical teenager, hanging out with friends, occasionally getting into trouble and wanting to be everywhere but the classroom his parents insisted he stay in. What’s more, the elder Lopez—a musician himself— didn’t approve of his son’s circle of friends, and was always warning him to stay away from his associates. Legend has it that Lopez, Sr. grew so weary of his son’s behavior that one day he administered a severe beating in the hope of changing his son’s ways. Afterwards, he felt so bad he went out and purchased his son a black Gibson acoustic guitar. He taught him a few chords and the rest, you can say, is history!
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New Jersey Folk Rocker Matt White Has a J-200 and a Sweet, Guitar-Driven Album That’s Sure to Make Him a Star

David Sprague
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10.04.2007

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Some folks choose to pick up a guitar and play, while others have the call of the six-string encoded in their DNA—the latter category most assuredly includes Matt White, a New Jersey-bred folk-rocker with three generations of musical pedigree (not to mention a wicked way with a memorable hook) behind him.
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Revisiting Black Sabbath: The Dio Years

Aidin Vaziri
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10.03.2007

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Heaven and Hell may wrap up its North American tour this week but that doesn’t mean you need to kick yourself for missing out on the fleeting reunion of Black Sabbath’s founding members—guitarist Tony Iommi, bassist Terry “Geezer” Butler, vocalist Ronnie James Dio, and drummer Vinny Appice.
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Dusty Gem: Rockpile’s Seconds of Pleasure

Josh Baron
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10.03.2007

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As a musicologist or lesser authority—music geek, nerd, enthusiast—one of life’s true pleasures is discovering new music. Whether it’s recent or old, the hunt for something “new” is always on. As a young editor, I’ve often found asking older friends a fruitful beginning for such hunts. So it was several weeks ago over dinner that I discovered Rockpile, a one-album, no-frills band whose years of playing out has instilled them into the hearts of just about every music geek I’ve met over the age of 40.
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Ian Astbury on The Cult, The Doors, and Life as a Dirty Little Rockstar (Free MP3 Stream!)

David Sprague
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10.03.2007

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You say you want an evolution? Well, if you come to Cult frontman Ian Astbury’s door, you’ve come to the right place. Ever since he emerged from the murk of post-punk England with the dark and stormy Southern Death Cult—a combo that added an incendiary touch to the gloom of the monochromatic goth scene—Astbury has been confounding expectations left and right. After altering that band’s course and renaming it Death Cult, he dropped the fatalistic bent altogether in 1984, bringing the Cult into the rock mainstream. Amidst the crunching classic-rock riffs guitarist Billy Duffy coaxes from his ES-1275 and his collection of Les Paul Customs, surprisingly idealistic anthems like “She Sells Sanctuary” have recently emerged.
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James Blunt: The Gibson Interview

David Sprague
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10.02.2007

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He’s no Deadhead, but James Blunt has certainly learned the meaning of “long, strange trip” in the three or so years since he ceased toiling in the singer-songwriter trenches and began his ascent to multi-platinum status. Blunt’s best known, of course, for the ubiquitous “You’re Beautiful,” but as he proves on All the Lost Souls—the just-released follow-up to his 11-million selling debut Back to Bedlam—he’s not just a one-trick pony. The Brit, who divides his time between piano and guitar (he wields both a Gibson J-45 and a vintage LG-1), exudes a burnished warmth throughout the disc, bringing to mind Lindsay Buckingham and James Taylor.
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